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Weekly Roundup: Kids Aren’t Getting Enough P.E.

A new study finds that most schools are not providing the recommended amount of physical education, CNN reports. The study examined P.E. programs in all 50 states and found only six where elementary schools followed recommended guidelines, two where middle schools did and none for high schools.

Americans Need to Eat More Fruits and Veggies

The good news: A majority of Americans say they are trying to eat more fruits and vegetables. The bad news? Most people are still consuming less than half of what the government recommends, USA Today reports.

Michelle Obama Announces “Let’s Move!” Video Winners

First Lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move! campaign unveiled the winners of a video competition designed to get faith and community leaders involved in the effort to reduce childhood obesity. The winners of the Let’s Move! Communities on the Move video challenge will be invited to the White House. First prize went to Macedonia Missionary Baptist Church in Eatonville, Fla., the Examiner reports.

Leader Casey Hinds on How Being a Pilot Helps Her Raise Healthy Kids

Casey Hinds, a Kentucky-based Leader who recently urged PreventObesity.net Leaders and Supporters to support healthy school snacks, penned a great op-ed for The Lunch Tray this week on how her experience as a military pilot has helped her raise healthy kids. It's a wonderful read; here's an excerpt:

"In pilot training, I learned habits of personal protection. I donned my helmet, gloves, flight suit, boots and earplugs for every flight.  With a family history of diabetes, teaching my children healthy habits of personal protection was not just the 'right thing to do' but a must-do.  I have seen the devastation this disease can wreak on loved ones and know the wisdom of the expression 'genetics loads the gun and environment pulls the trigger.'"

Visit The Lunch Tray to read the entire piece. Note: Bettina Elias Siegel, who authors the blog, also is a PreventObesity.net Leader.

Peers Influence Weight, Study Finds

A new study of high school students finds that teens are more likely to become overweight or obese if they were friends with people already heavier than they were, HealthDay News reports (via Philly.com). Researchers say that could shape how to tackle obesity in teens. “We should not be treating adolescents in isolation,” researcher David Shoham said.

Report: Childhood Obesity Remains a Top Health Concern for Kids

It’s probably not a surprise to those already working to reverse childhood obesity, but an annual report on the state of children’s health in America finds that obesity continues to plague many kids. U.S. News and World Report writes that while childhood obesity remains a big concern, headway has been made to reduce infant mortality, preterm births and teen births.

Overweight People More Likely to Develop Colon Polyps

Fox News reports on new research that shows overweight and obese people are more likely to develop colon polyps, a possible precursor to cancer. Most colon cancers develop from polyps, although less than 10 percent become cancerous.

Don't Forget to Take Action!

If you are in New York, be sure to write to the New York City Board of Health and let them know what you think about the Mayor's proposal to limit the size of most sugary drinks sold in the city to 16 ounces. And if you haven't already, tell the Walt Disney Company thanks for setting nutritional standards for what food and beverages can be advertised to kids on its various media outlets.

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Inside Track

Childhood Obesity Rates Stabilize While Disparities Persist

09/04/2014

A new report from the Trust for America’s Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) sheds light on the most recent statistics of adult and childhood obesity rates and disparities...

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Sweeter Summer Blog Series: An Interview with Mark Scherzer

08/28/2014

The final blog post in our #SweeterSummer blog series comes from PreventObesity.net Leader Mark Scherzer.

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